Cart 0 items: $0.00

Close

Qty Item Description Price Total
  Subtotal $0.00

View Cart

 

At Elden SHIPPING IS INCLUDED (on case quantities, Continental USA).

Burgundy Wine Cellars

TOP
Type
Red Wine
Hospices de Beaune Volnay-Santenots 1er Cru Cuvee Gauvin 2013

Hospices de Beaune Volnay-Santenots 1er Cru Cuvee Gauvin 2013

Appellation
Volnay-Santenots
Region
Côte de Beaune
Vintage
2013
Add To Cart
$98.00
 
SKU: EELD01R-13
Overview

2013 was a difficult harvest for the folks at the Hospices de Beaune. Many of their vineyards are in the zone that suffered hail damage. But for the vineyards that escaped unscathed, the results were fabulous. And such is the case with ‘our’ Volnay-Santenots. There is a deep complexity here, toasty and spicy, with structure meant to last. It’s fleshy, dense and round. A luscious glass of wine that makes you want more.

Producer

HOSPICES DE BEAUNE

Beaune

Elden Selection purchased a barrel of Volnay-Santenot ‘Cuvee Gauvin’ at the Hospices de Beaune charity wine auction in 2013. It was a dream-come-true moment for us. We have lived in Burgundy for over 30 years and the Hospices sale marks a special moment in our calendar. We take pride in our place in the world of Burgundy wine. We are cheerleaders for quality small-production domains. And it’s from these people that we learned the traditions and values that are embodied in the Hospices de Beaune’s wine production. Their vines are a legacy from the very history of Burgundy, donations from landowners for the care of the local population and the upkeep of Burgundian patrimony.

Our Volnay-Santenots has been a treasured vineyard since the earliest mentions of it in the 13th century. But if you want to find it on a map, don’t look in Volnay! The entire vineyard lies wholly in Meursault. But because Meursault is known primarily for its white wines, and the wines made in Les Santenots so closely resemble Volnay, a tradition cross-border courtesy remains.

The vineyard that makes the Cuvee Gauvin sits on two named parcels: 0.72ha in Les Plures and 0.68ha in the superb Santenots du Milieu. It is one of the prides of the Hospices de Beaune.

Vintage

BURGUNDY 2013

Burgundy 2013 was yet another small crop. The fourth in as many years. Some of it will be very good, in both red and white. But for some producers it was a disaster. As we always do, let’s start with a run-down of the weather conditions over the growing season (what the locals tellingly call ‘the campaign’).

Winter was wet and hung on stubbornly. March snow gave way to a few spring-like days, and everyone thought the worst was over. But no. April was cold and wet. May was the wettest on record. We posted photos of ducks swimming in the flooded vineyards. And winter gloom and temperatures persisted.

June was better, but just. Flowering started in the early part of the month, but with the cool wet conditions it was erratic and irregular. Lots of coulure and millerandange as a result. These aborted grapes would be one of the reasons for a small 2013 yield, and would come in to play in the final outcome at harvest.

Summer arrived late in the month. But even the warm temperatures and relatively fine weather did little to dispel the feeling of instability. There was nothing consistent to make you feel like you could just settle in to grape growing.

Then in the third week of July, high pressure and high humidity built up to a series of storms, the most violent of which tore out of the Savigny valley on the 23rd. Like a military gunship, the hail storm swept across the Savigny vines, hit Pernand on the west side of the Corton Mountain and headed south across Beaune, Pommard and Volnay. Producers tell us it lasted almost half an hour. It was the second year running that Pommard and Volnay were ravaged.

The humidity continued into August, and producers up and down the Cote nervously watched the sky. The big fear now was that damaged grapes would rot of mildew and odium, so preventive spraying intensified. If there was a bright spot in the growing season, it was the dry spell in mid-August. The damaged grapes shriveled and dropped off the vine, making the inevitable sorting at harvest more manageable.

Yields were tiny, even in the areas not ripped by hail. But the quality of the fruit was good going into September in the Cotes de Nuits and the white wine production south of Beaune, as well as in the Chalonnaise, Maconnais and Chablis.

Most of the harvest came in in the first weeks of October, the latest Burgundy vintages since 1991 and 1978. Maturity arrived at the end. Slowly at first, just like Pinot Noir and Chardonnay like it to be. But that slow maturity turned into a gallop, especially for the whites. From Macon to Chablis, the quality of 2013 whites comes down to crucial decisions about when to pick in the final few days.

Two months prior to harvest, the mood was gloomy. And granted, those poor producers who got slammed in July will suffer for years. (Some say that another small crop in 2014 could force some out of business.) But there is quality in many cellars. The reds will be highly variable, but the best wines (from domains that sorted the harvest carefully as it came to the cuverie) are fresh, deeply colored and beautifully ripe, with balance that seems apt for long aging. As always, you have to know who made the wine. There is more consistent quality in the whites across the board. Some say an excellent exciting year.

Appellation

VOLNAY

COTE DE BEAUNE

The village of Volnay is perched on the slope of a hill, above the band of premier cru vines, high up in the Côte de Beaune. The hill itself is oriented slightly differently from the general run of the country so that the vines face south-east rather than east. Volnay has more than 50% of its appellation classified as premier cru. There have been some recent changes, and as of 2006, some of the premiers crus have been combined. Chanlin is now part of Pitures. Les Aussy is now in Le Roncet. Carelle sous la Chapelle and Carelles-Dessous have become Carelle-Dessous la Chapelle. And En l'Ormeau is now part of Les Mitans. The Volnay appellation is twinned with Volnay-Santenots, grown in neighboring Meursault on soils suited to the Pinot Noir grape.

Produced in the commune of Volnay for appellation 'Volnay' and in Meursault for Santenots 1er Cru, appellation Volnay includes 29 premiers crus.

Wines

Volnay admired for its delicacy, its juiciness and its bouquet, is always described (by the non-PC Burgundians, at least) as the most feminine of the Burgundy reds. Though some parcels produce tighter and more muscular Pinot Noir, most Volnay is known for finesse. Color ranges from ruby to garnet, and the nose is famously of violets, though with age you get the classic Burgundy Pinot secondary aromas of spice and undergrowth. But its precocious fruitiness makes it apt to be opened fairly young, especially in delicate vintages.

Terroirs

Oolitic limestone bears a resemblance to the reddish igneous rock porphyry found in the Morvan district. It is pink in color with pale green inclusions and overlain by banks of schist. At the top of the slope, this limestone predominates. Lower down we find white, chalky argovien limestone. Lower still are reddish bathonien limestone, pebbly and with iron content. The soils at the foot of the slope are deeper and more gravelly. Altitudes are in a relatively narrow band at 230-280 meters.

Color

Red wines only - Pinot Noir

White wines from Chardonnay are grown in the climat of Santenots (commune of Meursault) which are entitled to the appellations Mersault 1er Cru or Meursault-Santenots, or Meursault.

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

206.70 ha (including 117.65 ha premier cru)

Food

Its velvety finesse combined with aromatic intensity makes Volnay a partner for sophisticated poultry dishes, roasted and glazed, which meld with the fruit and spice aromas of the wine. Better still, especially for the premiers crus, is feathered game, stewed or slowly braised, or simply roasted. The intensity of Volnay allows it to go well with many full-flavored cheeses.

Appellations

On the label, the appellations Volnay and Volnay 1er Cru may be followed by the name of a specific vineyard, known as a climat. 'Santenots' is a separate climat lying within the appellation 'Volnay' and classified as premier cru.

The following climats are classified as premier cru:

Carelle-Dessous la Chapelle

Champans

Clos de l'Audignac

Clos de la Barre

Clos de la Bousse-d'Or

Clos de la Cave des Ducs

Clos de la Chapelle

Clos de la Rougeotte

Clos des 60 Ouvrées

Clos des Chênes

Clos des Ducs

Clos du Château des Ducs

Clos du Verseuil

En Chevret

Frémiets

Frémiets - Clos de la Rougeotte

La Gigotte

Lassolle

Le Ronceret

Le Village

Les Angles

Les Brouillards

Les Caillerets

Les Lurets

Les Mitans

Pitures Dessus

Robardelle

Santenots

Taille Pieds

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard, known as a lieu-dit:

Beau Regard

Cros Martin

En Vaut

Ez Blanches

Ez Echards

La Bouchère

La Cave

La Gigotte

Le Village

Les Aussy

Les Buttes

Les Combes

Les Famines

Les Grands Champs

Les Grands Poisots

Les Jouères

Les Lurets

Les Pasquiers

Les Petits Gamets

Les Petits Poisots

Les Pluchots

Les Serpens

Paux Bois

Sur Roches

Continue Shopping
Sign up for inside offers, Burgundy News, and Special Promotions!