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Burgundy Wine Cellars

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Type
Red Wine
Domaine Thierry Mortet Gevrey-Chambertin 'Vigne Belle' 2012 Image

Domaine Thierry Mortet Gevrey-Chambertin 'Vigne Belle' 2012

Appellation
Gevrey-Chambertin
Region
Côte de Nuits
Vintage
2012
Add To Cart
$77.00
 
SKU: ETMO03R-12
Overview


This single vineyard village Gevrey-Chambertin is not called ‘Vigne Belle’ (beautiful vine) for nothing. This vineyard produces one of the finest expressions of Gevrey-Chambertin ‘terroir’ in the AOC zone. The domain produces about 3000 bottles a year of old vine wine that is subtle and complex, suave and voluminous. A gem in Gevrey.
 

Producer

DOMAINE THIERRY MORTET

We first met Thierry Mortet at one of the early editions of the ‘Grands Jours de Bourgogne’ where the theme of the Gevrey-Chambertin tasting was the two distinct village appellation zones on either side of the mouth of the Combe Lavaux. Tasting at Thierry’s stand was a master class in the subject that is as clear today as it was twenty years ago.

Thierry Mortet took over his half of the family domain, Domaine Charles Mortet et Fils in 1992 with 4 hectares of vines. He now oversees 7.3 hectares (just under 17 acres) of production, 6 ha in red and the rest in white, for an annual production of 30-35000 bottles. When he officially converted his domain to organic agriculture in 2007, he was merely codifying practices that he had already been following for years out of respect for the environment and an understanding of the cultural significance of his work.

Vintage

BURGUNDY 2012

>What a surprise! To say today that the 2012 harvest produced, not just a good Burgundy vintage but an exceptional one, beggars belief.

Here in Burgundy it is often said that June makes the quantity and September makes the quality. And 2012 was a classic example. But because 2012 was such a lousy growing season, and because the wine is just so good, folks are trying to understand why and how that can be.

Here’s how we saw it. It all started well before the sap started to rise in the vines. February was frigid. We had two consecutive weeks where the temperature did not rise above freezing. Our producers tell us that this polar period may have had an important effect on what was to come, notably the poor flowering later in June.Then March was just about all the springtime we had. In fact it was more like summer than summer was. And with those warm dry sunny days, the vines leapt into action. The sap rose and the buds burst well before the end of the month. Everyone was talking about an August harvest! It was, considering what was to come, a glorious time.

Then April brought radical change. A four month period of gloomy cold and wet set in. It rained one day in three until July. And during this time a series of hailstorms shattered the vineyards, especially in the south. The vines flowered in early June, but this was slow and drawn out over the course of the month. Because of this, a lot of the flowering failed. Every incident, it seemed, reduced the potential yield of the crop. Many producers reported as much as 50% crop loss. Some, in the areas worst hit by hail, were almost wiped out.

Then it got warm and the threat of rot turned to reality. Mildew and oidium were rampant. Producers later said that if you were late with copper sulfate treatments in 2012 it was fatal. Then it got hot. And grapes literally grilled on the vine in August, scorched by the heat.

The locals are saying that every month claimed its part of the crop. So the first thing to remember about 2012 is that it is a small harvest, and a very small harvest in certain zones. But what happened next saved the day for what remained on the vine.

Mid-August was hot and sunny, and this continued until well in to of September. The well-watered vines fed what grapes remained, and sugar levels shot up dramatically. It felt like a time of healing. The crop was made up of small clusters of grapes with very thick skins, with lots of space between the berries to allow them to expand and to let air circulate.

So with a healthy albeit small crop on the vines, and what appeared to be stable weather conditions, the producers felt safe that they could wait for ideal maturity. And when harvest began in the latter half of September, the grapes were in good condition. Which is just as well, because halfway through it started to rain and got cold. The worry again was rot. But the thick-skinned grapes were resistant, and the cool temperature kept botrytis at bay.

Those cool final days had another advantage. The fruit was brought to the winery at an ideal temperature to allow a few days of cool maceration before fermentations started, slowly and gently. So from the very start, these wines have shown brilliant color and delicate aromas.

Appellation

CHAMBOLLE-MUSIGNY

COTES DE NUITS

Chambolle-Musigny is a tiny village, and is likely to remain so. Expansion would mean encroaching on some of the best vineyard land in the world. With two superb Grands Crus, Bonnes Mares (which links Chambolle to Morey-Saint-Denis), and Musigny, which overlooks the Clos de Vougeot, the village also has several prestigious premier cru, notably among them Les Amoureuses. Its AOC dates from September 1936, making it one of the first French vineyards to be designated.

Produced in the commune of Chambolle-Musigny, the appellation Chambolle-Musigny includes 24 premiers crus as well as two Grands Crus: Musigny and Bonnes Mares.

Wine

Chambolle-Musigny is Pinot Noir par excellence, and is often regarded as the most elegant wine of the Côte de Nuits. Its intensity is subtle. It tends to be bright ruby and may darken a little over time. Its violet bouquet is one of the most easily recognizable in Burgundy. With aging it tends towards spiced ripe fruits and truffle, underbrush and animal notes. Rich and complex, it is silky and lacy on the one hand, and solid and structured on the other.

Terroirs

The slope faces east at altitudes of 250-300 meters with only a shallow covering of soil overlying the parent rock, but fissures in the hard Jurassic limestone allow the roots to seek dig deep into the complex sub-soil. Gravel in the valley bottom ensures good drainage.

Color

Red wines exclusively - Pinot Noir

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

152.23 ha (including 56.23 ha premier cru)

Food

With a personality that is both powerful and delicate, the wines of Chambolle call for sophisticated cuisine. Feathered game in sauce, roasted lamb or a free-range capon. Roast veal's subtle texture would work too. Cheeses should be mild : Brillat-Savarin, Reblochon, Cîteaux, Vacherin, Brie de Meaux or Chaource.

Appellations

The following climats are classified as premier cru:

Aux Beaux Bruns

Aux Combottes

Aux Echanges

Derrière la Grange

La Combe d'Orveau

Les Amoureuses

Les Baudes

Les Borniques

Les Carrières

Les Chabiots

Les Charmes

Les Chatelots

Les Combottes

Les Cras

Les Feusselottes (ou « Les Feusselotes »)

Les Fuées

Les Groseilles

Les Gruenchers

Les Hauts Doix

Les Lavrottes

Les Noirots

Les Plantes

Les Sentiers

Les Véroilles

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard known as a lieu-dit:

Aux Croix

Derrière le Four

La Combe d'Orveau

La Taupev

Le Village

Les Argillières

Les Athets

Les Babillères

Les Barottes

Les Bas Doix

Les Bussières

Les Chardannes

Les clos

Les Clos de l'Orme

Les Condemennes

Les Cras

Les Creux Baissants

Les Danguerrins

Les Drazey

Les Echezeaux

Les Fouchères

Les Fremières

Les Gamaires

Les Guérippes

Les Herbues

Les Jutruots

Les Mal Carrées

Les Maladières

Les Mombies

Les Nazoires

Les Pas de Chat

Les Porlottes

Les Sordes

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