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Burgundy Wine Cellars

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Type
Red Wine
Domaine Pierre Naigeon Gevrey-Chambertin 'Creux Brouillard' 2012

Domaine Pierre Naigeon Gevrey-Chambertin 'Creux Brouillard' 2012

Appellation
Gevrey-Chambertin
Region
Côte de Nuits
Vintage
2012
Add To Cart
$67.00
 
SKU: EPNA03R-12
Overview

Pierre Naigeon only makes single-vineyard wines (more than 25 different lieu-dit) that are vinified and bottled separately, without fining or filtration, to guard the pure expression of each terroir. This single-vineyard Gevrey-Chambertin 'Creux Brouillard' (which means 'foggy hollow') produced 3450 bottles in 2012. So Gevrey. Pure, floral and fruity. Great open bouquet, crisp juicy fruit, good balance and acidity, and lots of stuffing. A stellar finish.

Producer

DOMAINE PIERRE NAIGEON

Gevrey-Chambertin

The Domaine Naigeon, though old by even Burgundy standards, remained fairly small until the present generation. Shortly after 1945 Pierre Naigeon gave his name to the domain that is now managed by his grandson, also named Pierre. Until 2005 the domain consisted of two hectares of two grands crus, Charmes-Chambertin and Bonnes-Mares! In 2006, Domaine Pierre Naigeon dramatically increased its size with the addition of 9 hectares of vineyards in the Hautes Côtes de Nuits and Gevrey Chambertin area.

It was at this stage that Elden Wine first met and presented Pierre Naigeon’s wines, being one of the first in the US to do so.

The Domaine is now more than 11.5 hectares (almost 28 acres), with 50 different plots in the Côte de Nuits. The vines of Domaine Pierre Naigeon average 50 years of age. This is considered quite remarkable in Burgundy, and ensures consistently low yielding vines producing high quality wines.

Aside from the domain-owned vineyards, Pierre Naigeon also sources high quality fruit from various parts of Burgundy including many of the most prestigious appellations of the Côte de Nuits and Chardonnay from the Côte de Beaune. An impressive range of wines is produced including 3 Grands Crus, 6 Premiers Crus and 8 Villages. The Domain now produces more than 25 different single vineyard wines.

The wines are vinified and bottled separately, following traditional practices, without fining and filtration, to keep the pure expression of the terroir.

APPELLATIONS

RED

Bonnes Mares Grand Cru

Mazys Chambertin Grand Cru

Charmes Chambertin Grand Cru

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Les Cazetiers »

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Lavaux Saint Jacques »

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Les Fontenys »

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Les Perrières »

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Les Cherbaudes »

Fixin Premier Cru « Les Hervelets »

Gevrey Chambertin « En Vosne »

Gevrey Chambertin « Echezeaux »

Gevrey Chambertin « Les Crais »

Gevrey Chambertin « Les Corvées »

Gevrey Chambertin

Vosne Romanée

Chambolle Musigny

Morey Saint Denis « Les Herbuottes »

Fixin « Les Herbues »

Bourgogne Hautes Cotes de Nuits

Bourgogne Pinot Noir

Bourgogne Pinot Noir « Les Maladières »

Bourgogne Passetoutgrain « La Riotte »

WHITE

Chassagne Montrachet Premier Cru « Les Embrazées »

Puligny Montrachet « Les Reuchaux »

Bourgogne Hautes Cotes de Nuits

Bourgogne Grand Ordinaire Chardonnay & Pinot Beurot

Bourgogne Aligoté

PRINCIPLES

So that the grapes are picked at the optimum stage of ripeness, particular care is given to vineyard work throughout the year.

Manual pruning, using the "Guyot" method (cane pruning), takes place in March and early April. Minimal use of organic fertilizer combined with older vine age, naturally limits grape yield. The weed population is limited by cultivating the soil, which eliminates the use of chemical herbicides. Only organic products are used to protect the vines against insects. These beliefs and practices are enforced to ensure a sustainable philosophy, producing natural wines and protecting the environment for future generations.

Specific attention is paid to crop yields, with the use of shoot thinning, bunch thinning and ‘green harvest’ if required. It is considered optimal that the vines carry five to six bunches prior to harvest.

Since the 2002 harvest, Domaine Pierre Naigeon has been using flat bins (similar to those used in Burgundy's most famous domain situated in Vosne-Romanée). The grape pickers simply place the grapes in these cases without first putting them in a basket as is done traditionally. Each shallow case can contain only one layer of grapes thus avoiding crushing, hence juice oxidation. Care is taken to ensure the cases are never placed on the ground before reaching the sorting table, limiting contamination. Moreover, the cases are latticed to allow damaged fruit, rainwater or dew to drain off. Only rigorously selected, undamaged fruit is vinified in the vats.

The vinification takes place in two phases; a 5 to 10 day cold maceration period (12 to 15°C) followed by an alcoholic fermentation, by the natural grape yeasts. This second phase lasts around two weeks under controlled temperatures.

Once the fermentation is completed, the wine is put into oak barrels in the cellar. The proportion of new oak varies according to the year and appellation. The pressing of fermented skins is carried out using a pneumatic press, which ensures gentle extraction of desirable tannins to ensure the structure associated with great Burgundy.

During the maturation in oak barrels the wine is racked once after the malolactic fermentation. This involves the malic acid being converted to lactic acid, decreasing total acidity and resulting in a more balanced wine.

Barrel ageing lasts between 12 and 22 months. Once a week each barrel is topped (ouillage) to preserve the freshness and prevent oxidation of the wine.

Wine is tasted and assessed regularly during barrel maturation and is bottled according to moon phases. The bottling is done traditionally, without fining or filtration, directly from each cask with a "two-nosed goat", a stainless steel tap with two openings. Corks are inserted with a hand-operated corking machine. Only two barrels a day (600 bottles) are bottled.

VINIFICATION

White wine fermentations are natural, without the addition of cultured yeasts. The whites are raised on the lees for between 12 and 15 months in 20-30% new oak, with regular batonnage (stirring of the lees). Red wine fermentations are natural, without the addition of cultured yeasts, in thero-regulated tanks. 15-20 days vatting time. They are then raised 15 and 18 months in 30% new oak.

Vintage

BURGUNDY 2012

>What a surprise! To say today that the 2012 harvest produced, not just a good Burgundy vintage but an exceptional one, beggars belief.

Here in Burgundy it is often said that June makes the quantity and September makes the quality. And 2012 was a classic example. But because 2012 was such a lousy growing season, and because the wine is just so good, folks are trying to understand why and how that can be.

Here’s how we saw it. It all started well before the sap started to rise in the vines. February was frigid. We had two consecutive weeks where the temperature did not rise above freezing. Our producers tell us that this polar period may have had an important effect on what was to come, notably the poor flowering later in June.Then March was just about all the springtime we had. In fact it was more like summer than summer was. And with those warm dry sunny days, the vines leapt into action. The sap rose and the buds burst well before the end of the month. Everyone was talking about an August harvest! It was, considering what was to come, a glorious time.

Then April brought radical change. A four month period of gloomy cold and wet set in. It rained one day in three until July. And during this time a series of hailstorms shattered the vineyards, especially in the south. The vines flowered in early June, but this was slow and drawn out over the course of the month. Because of this, a lot of the flowering failed. Every incident, it seemed, reduced the potential yield of the crop. Many producers reported as much as 50% crop loss. Some, in the areas worst hit by hail, were almost wiped out.

Then it got warm and the threat of rot turned to reality. Mildew and oidium were rampant. Producers later said that if you were late with copper sulfate treatments in 2012 it was fatal. Then it got hot. And grapes literally grilled on the vine in August, scorched by the heat.

The locals are saying that every month claimed its part of the crop. So the first thing to remember about 2012 is that it is a small harvest, and a very small harvest in certain zones. But what happened next saved the day for what remained on the vine.

Mid-August was hot and sunny, and this continued until well in to of September. The well-watered vines fed what grapes remained, and sugar levels shot up dramatically. It felt like a time of healing. The crop was made up of small clusters of grapes with very thick skins, with lots of space between the berries to allow them to expand and to let air circulate.

So with a healthy albeit small crop on the vines, and what appeared to be stable weather conditions, the producers felt safe that they could wait for ideal maturity. And when harvest began in the latter half of September, the grapes were in good condition. Which is just as well, because halfway through it started to rain and got cold. The worry again was rot. But the thick-skinned grapes were resistant, and the cool temperature kept botrytis at bay.

Those cool final days had another advantage. The fruit was brought to the winery at an ideal temperature to allow a few days of cool maceration before fermentations started, slowly and gently. So from the very start, these wines have shown brilliant color and delicate aromas.

Appellation

GEVREY-CHAMBERTIN

COTE DE NUITS

The vineyards of Gevrey-Chambertin swirl around the mouth of the Combe de Lavaux, a cleft in the hillside that has been eroding limestone slurry into the plains around the village of Gevrey for a geological epoch. Few appellations in Burgundy break down so neatly into zones: north of the combe lie most of the premier cru vineyards. The 9 grand cru vineyards are on the other side of the combe to the south. There are some good premiers crus in this sector as well, but they tend to be on the edges of the grands crus. Logically then, there are several different zones of village wine production, some very interesting, some (especially to the east) not.

Produced in the communes of Gevrey-Chambertin and Brochon, the appellation Gevrey-Chambertin includes 26 premiers crus. The commune of Gevrey-Chambertin also produces 9 grands crus.

Wines

In youth Gevrey-Chambertin is usually a bright ruby color, turning more black cherry with age. Strawberry and cherry fruits, violet and rose floral notes are common in the early days. Maturity brings out liquorice, leather and fur and hints of that Pinot underbrush. Youthful firm structure gives way to velvety tannins and delicate texture. Gevrey is what great burgundy should be: powerful, rich, and meaty. They can often be when drunk young to appreciate the fruit, but really these are wines for aging, often for long periods.

Terroirs

The grands crus sit on the eddys of the combe , with thin soils on crinoidal limestone; while most of the premiers crus occupy the upper portion of the Côte at heights of between 280 and 380 meters on shallow red limestone soils. Below them are the village appellation vines on brown limey soils. There are also marls covered with screes and red silt that have washed down from above the combe. These stony mixtures can produce elegant wine while the clayey marls, which contain rich deposits of fossilized shell-fish, add body and firmness. Exposures vary from east to south-east.

Color

Red wines only - Pinot Noir

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

409.65 ha (including 80.46 ha premier cru)

Food

Massive yet velvety, the wines of Gevrey-Chambertin should show power and structure, and should age admirably. This is a wine for meat-eaters. As it evolves, its gamey notes becomes a match for game, feathered or furred. It also goes superbly with rib steak, lamb, and fibrous meats, that need marinating or braising. It goes well with all the Burgundian strong cow-milk cheeses, in particular Époisses and Ami du Chambertin, and of course with the creamy purity of a Cîteaux.

Appellations

On the label, the appellations Gevrey-Chambertin and Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru may be followed by the name of the specific vineyard, known as a climat.

The following climats are classified as premier cru:

Au Closeau

Aux Combottes

Bel Air

Champeaux

Champonnet

Cherbaudes

Clos des Varoilles

Clos du Chapitre

Clos Prieur

Clos Saint-Jacques

Combe au Moine

Craipillot

En Ergot

Estournelles-Saint-Jacques

Fonteny

Issarts

La Bossière

La Perrière

La Romanée

Lavaut Saint-Jacques

Les Cazetiers

Les Corbeaux

Les Goulots

Petite Chapelle

Petits Cazetiers

Poissenot

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard, known as a lieu-dit:

Lieux-dits

Au Prunier

Au Vellé

Aux Corvées

Aux Echezeaux

Aux Etelois

Baraques

Billard

Carougeot

Champ

Champ Franc

Champerrier du Bas

Champerrier du Dessus

Champs-Chenys

Charreux

Chazière

Chéseaux

Clos Prieur-Bas

Combe de Lavaux

Combes du Bas

Combes du Dessus

Craite-Paille

Creux Brouillard

Croix des Champs

En Champs

En Dérée

En Pallud

En Songe

En Vosne

Es Murots

Grandes Rayes

Grands Champs

Jouise

La Bossière

La Brunelle

La Burie

La Justice

La Marie

La Nouroy

La Platière

Le Carré Rougeaud

Le Créot

Le Fourneau

Les Cercueils

Les Champs Perriers

Les Crais

Les Croisettes

Les Epointures

Les Evocelles

Les Gueulepines

Les Jeunes Rois

Les Journaux

Les Marchais

Les Seuvrées

Meix des Ouches

Meix-Bas

Mévelle

Pince-Vin

Pressonnier

Puits de la Baraque

Reniard

Roncevie

Sylvie

Tamisot

Vignes Belles

Village

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