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At Elden SHIPPING IS INCLUDED (on case quantities, Continental USA).

Burgundy Wine Cellars

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Type
Red Wine
Domaine Pierre Naigeon Bonnes Mares 2012

Domaine Pierre Naigeon Bonnes Mares 2012

Appellation
Grand Cru
Region
Côte de Nuits
Vintage
2012
Add To Cart
$269.00
 
SKU: EPNA05R-12
Overview

Pierre Naigeon only makes single-vineyard wines (more than 25 different lieu-dit) that are vinified and bottled separately, without fining or filtration, to guard the pure expression of each terroir. There were only 289 bottles of this Grand Cru Bonnes Mares produced in 2012, Discreet and delicately floral, yet compact and powerful. Very expressive and complex. Dense and savory, with deep spicy plum fruit and a killer spicy finish.

Producer

DOMAINE PIERRE NAIGEON

Gevrey-Chambertin

The Domaine Naigeon, though old by even Burgundy standards, remained fairly small until the present generation. Shortly after 1945 Pierre Naigeon gave his name to the domain that is now managed by his grandson, also named Pierre. Until 2005 the domain consisted of two hectares of two grands crus, Charmes-Chambertin and Bonnes-Mares! In 2006, Domaine Pierre Naigeon dramatically increased its size with the addition of 9 hectares of vineyards in the Hautes Côtes de Nuits and Gevrey Chambertin area.

It was at this stage that Elden Wine first met and presented Pierre Naigeon’s wines, being one of the first in the US to do so.

The Domaine is now more than 11.5 hectares (almost 28 acres), with 50 different plots in the Côte de Nuits. The vines of Domaine Pierre Naigeon average 50 years of age. This is considered quite remarkable in Burgundy, and ensures consistently low yielding vines producing high quality wines.

Aside from the domain-owned vineyards, Pierre Naigeon also sources high quality fruit from various parts of Burgundy including many of the most prestigious appellations of the Côte de Nuits and Chardonnay from the Côte de Beaune. An impressive range of wines is produced including 3 Grands Crus, 6 Premiers Crus and 8 Villages. The Domain now produces more than 25 different single vineyard wines.

The wines are vinified and bottled separately, following traditional practices, without fining and filtration, to keep the pure expression of the terroir.

APPELLATIONS

RED

Bonnes Mares Grand Cru

Mazys Chambertin Grand Cru

Charmes Chambertin Grand Cru

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Les Cazetiers »

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Lavaux Saint Jacques »

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Les Fontenys »

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Les Perrières »

Gevrey Chambertin Premier Cru « Les Cherbaudes »

Fixin Premier Cru « Les Hervelets »

Gevrey Chambertin « En Vosne »

Gevrey Chambertin « Echezeaux »

Gevrey Chambertin « Les Crais »

Gevrey Chambertin « Les Corvées »

Gevrey Chambertin

Vosne Romanée

Chambolle Musigny

Morey Saint Denis « Les Herbuottes »

Fixin « Les Herbues »

Bourgogne Hautes Cotes de Nuits

Bourgogne Pinot Noir

Bourgogne Pinot Noir « Les Maladières »

Bourgogne Passetoutgrain « La Riotte »

WHITE

Chassagne Montrachet Premier Cru « Les Embrazées »

Puligny Montrachet « Les Reuchaux »

Bourgogne Hautes Cotes de Nuits

Bourgogne Grand Ordinaire Chardonnay & Pinot Beurot

Bourgogne Aligoté

PRINCIPLES

So that the grapes are picked at the optimum stage of ripeness, particular care is given to vineyard work throughout the year.

Manual pruning, using the "Guyot" method (cane pruning), takes place in March and early April. Minimal use of organic fertilizer combined with older vine age, naturally limits grape yield. The weed population is limited by cultivating the soil, which eliminates the use of chemical herbicides. Only organic products are used to protect the vines against insects. These beliefs and practices are enforced to ensure a sustainable philosophy, producing natural wines and protecting the environment for future generations.

Specific attention is paid to crop yields, with the use of shoot thinning, bunch thinning and ‘green harvest’ if required. It is considered optimal that the vines carry five to six bunches prior to harvest.

Since the 2002 harvest, Domaine Pierre Naigeon has been using flat bins (similar to those used in Burgundy's most famous domain situated in Vosne-Romanée). The grape pickers simply place the grapes in these cases without first putting them in a basket as is done traditionally. Each shallow case can contain only one layer of grapes thus avoiding crushing, hence juice oxidation. Care is taken to ensure the cases are never placed on the ground before reaching the sorting table, limiting contamination. Moreover, the cases are latticed to allow damaged fruit, rainwater or dew to drain off. Only rigorously selected, undamaged fruit is vinified in the vats.

The vinification takes place in two phases; a 5 to 10 day cold maceration period (12 to 15°C) followed by an alcoholic fermentation, by the natural grape yeasts. This second phase lasts around two weeks under controlled temperatures.

Once the fermentation is completed, the wine is put into oak barrels in the cellar. The proportion of new oak varies according to the year and appellation. The pressing of fermented skins is carried out using a pneumatic press, which ensures gentle extraction of desirable tannins to ensure the structure associated with great Burgundy.

During the maturation in oak barrels the wine is racked once after the malolactic fermentation. This involves the malic acid being converted to lactic acid, decreasing total acidity and resulting in a more balanced wine.

Barrel ageing lasts between 12 and 22 months. Once a week each barrel is topped (ouillage) to preserve the freshness and prevent oxidation of the wine.

Wine is tasted and assessed regularly during barrel maturation and is bottled according to moon phases. The bottling is done traditionally, without fining or filtration, directly from each cask with a "two-nosed goat", a stainless steel tap with two openings. Corks are inserted with a hand-operated corking machine. Only two barrels a day (600 bottles) are bottled.

VINIFICATION

White wine fermentations are natural, without the addition of cultured yeasts. The whites are raised on the lees for between 12 and 15 months in 20-30% new oak, with regular batonnage (stirring of the lees). Red wine fermentations are natural, without the addition of cultured yeasts, in thero-regulated tanks. 15-20 days vatting time. They are then raised 15 and 18 months in 30% new oak.

Vintage

BURGUNDY 2012

>What a surprise! To say today that the 2012 harvest produced, not just a good Burgundy vintage but an exceptional one, beggars belief.

Here in Burgundy it is often said that June makes the quantity and September makes the quality. And 2012 was a classic example. But because 2012 was such a lousy growing season, and because the wine is just so good, folks are trying to understand why and how that can be.

Here’s how we saw it. It all started well before the sap started to rise in the vines. February was frigid. We had two consecutive weeks where the temperature did not rise above freezing. Our producers tell us that this polar period may have had an important effect on what was to come, notably the poor flowering later in June.Then March was just about all the springtime we had. In fact it was more like summer than summer was. And with those warm dry sunny days, the vines leapt into action. The sap rose and the buds burst well before the end of the month. Everyone was talking about an August harvest! It was, considering what was to come, a glorious time.

Then April brought radical change. A four month period of gloomy cold and wet set in. It rained one day in three until July. And during this time a series of hailstorms shattered the vineyards, especially in the south. The vines flowered in early June, but this was slow and drawn out over the course of the month. Because of this, a lot of the flowering failed. Every incident, it seemed, reduced the potential yield of the crop. Many producers reported as much as 50% crop loss. Some, in the areas worst hit by hail, were almost wiped out.

Then it got warm and the threat of rot turned to reality. Mildew and oidium were rampant. Producers later said that if you were late with copper sulfate treatments in 2012 it was fatal. Then it got hot. And grapes literally grilled on the vine in August, scorched by the heat.

The locals are saying that every month claimed its part of the crop. So the first thing to remember about 2012 is that it is a small harvest, and a very small harvest in certain zones. But what happened next saved the day for what remained on the vine.

Mid-August was hot and sunny, and this continued until well in to of September. The well-watered vines fed what grapes remained, and sugar levels shot up dramatically. It felt like a time of healing. The crop was made up of small clusters of grapes with very thick skins, with lots of space between the berries to allow them to expand and to let air circulate.

So with a healthy albeit small crop on the vines, and what appeared to be stable weather conditions, the producers felt safe that they could wait for ideal maturity. And when harvest began in the latter half of September, the grapes were in good condition. Which is just as well, because halfway through it started to rain and got cold. The worry again was rot. But the thick-skinned grapes were resistant, and the cool temperature kept botrytis at bay.

Those cool final days had another advantage. The fruit was brought to the winery at an ideal temperature to allow a few days of cool maceration before fermentations started, slowly and gently. So from the very start, these wines have shown brilliant color and delicate aromas.

Appellation

BONNES-MARES

GRAND CRU

COTE DE NUITS

The appellation Bonnes-Mares lies just south of the Grand Cru Clos de Tart, forming a rectangle between the hollowed hillsides of Morey-Saint Denis and Chambolle-Musigny. More of it lies in the territory of Chambolle-Musigny than that of Morey-Saint-Denis. East-facing exposition and at an altitude averaging between 250 and 280 meters

Here, Morey and Chambolle show the ability of the Côte de Nuits to blend two temperaments into a single personality. Bonnes-Mares has been known by this name since the late Middle Ages, though the etymology remains uncertain. The origin might be the verb ‘marer’, meaning “to cultivate carefully”, although romantics like to think the name alludes to ancient mother-goddesses.

Wines

Bonnes-Mares is rich and fleshy with mouth-filling body. It has a clearly defined structure, full-bodied rather than flowery, and at times a little wild. It will stand long aging. Wine lovers argue over the nuances between the Morey side of the appellation from the Chambolle end. The roundness of the one and the elegance of the other are subsumed in the tannic power common to both. It evokes violets, humus and undergrowth.

Terroirs

The sub-soil consists of Jurassic period limestone and white marl and underlies clay-flint soils some 40 cm in depth on a gently sloping site. The soil is light and gravelly, brown or reddish in color.

Color

Only red wines - Pinot Noir

Area under production 14.72 ha./ 35.33 acres

Average annual yield 500 hl (67,000 bottles).

Food

The blend of heft and texture makes Bonnes-Mares a worthy equal to game, which responds well to its aromatic intensity and, in mature vintages, its muskiness. Roasted game works well, but the wine will also take on stews as well as fine wine-based sauces. Duck goes well too because the tannic structure in the wine gives structure back to an aromatic meat. It also goes well with aged ‘pate presse’ cheeses like Beaufort. Serving temperature: 14 to 16°C

Appellations

On the label, the words 'Grand Cru' must appear immediately below the name of the appellation in characters of identical size.

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