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Burgundy Wine Cellars

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Type
White Wine
Domaine Jean Fery Savigny les Beaune 1er Cru 'Les Vergelesses' Blanc 2014

Domaine Jean Fery Savigny les Beaune 1er Cru 'Les Vergelesses' Blanc 2014

Appellation
Savigny les Beaune
Region
Côte de Beaune
Vintage
2014
Add To Cart
$59.00
 
SKU: EFER02W-14
Overview

Yes, we admit, it can be complicated! There is this WHITE Savigny les Beaune 1er Cru 'Les Vergelesses', but the domain also makes both a red Savigny-les Beaune 1er Cru and a red Pernand-Vergelesses 1er Cru ‘Les Vergelesses’ as well. To make things even more complicated, the Pernand 'Vergelesses' and the two Savigny 'Vergelesses' touch another Pernand premier cru called 'Ile des Vergelesses'! Sorry! We do our best to keep it all simple and clear. In addition to being the most complicated corner of the Savigny valley, it is also the most interesting. This Savigny white is an eye-catcher, with a greeny-gold hint. Fresh, elegant fruit notes with spice tones and a hint of honey and flinty smokiness.

Producer

Domaine Jean Fery

Nestled in the Hautes Cotes village of Echevronne, the Domaine Jean Fery is the master plan of Jean-Louis Fery, the latest in a wine line dating back to the mid-1800s. From 1994, with the help of Alain Meunier of the Domaine Jean-Jacques Confuron, the Domaine Jean Fery went bio (without actually claiming the certification) and started expanding their vineyard holdings. From the 2006 harvest, Pascal Marchand took the reins, continuing the domain's quest for quality and integrity.

Vintage

BURGUNDY 2014

2014 was a year for maxims in Burgundy. One was the ‘don’t count your chickens’ warning. And another, a keystone in Burgundy wine making, was ‘September makes the wine’. Simple truths to heed.

After three very small harvests, Burgundy urgently needed to fill its cellars. And despite some heart-breaking setbacks and a growing season that was jumbled in disorder, a decent amount of wine was produced. Not enough, of course. But ‘correct’, as the French would say.

There was no winter to speak of, followed by a mild and sunny period from February through April that saw some rain, but less than normal. The vine got going early, and talk was of a late August harvest.

But May was cool and rainy, which slowed the development. The vine began to flower in the last week of May in the southern part of the region. So at that point, counting the traditional 100 days from flowering to harvest, picking would start in early September. The weather during the flowering period was sunny and warm with just enough rain for this critical period to unfold and to finish.

And then early June was hot. Summer hot. As June was in 2003, some have said. This speeded things up. The flowering in the northern part of the region, and in those vineyards at higher altitudes, got a kick that would help them to phenolic maturity later.

With these conditions, fruit began to appear soon thereafter, and by the end of June small grapes had formed and clustered. The hot dry conditions however led to both millerandage (unevenly formed bunches made up of normal grapes and thick-skinned seedless berries ) and coulure (buds that never flowered), both of which reduce the overall crop, but which can give concentration to the remaining fruit.

Flowering and fruit set was certainly among the earliest of the past twenty years, with as much as a week head start on what would be considered normal here. And if you compare 2013 to 2014, we were three weeks in advance.

Then disaster struck. At the end of June, a series of violent hail storms ripped through the region. One in the Cote de Nuits, where parts of Nuits and Chambolle-Musigny were hit with 20% crop loss. The other two in the Cote de Beaune: the first, widespread, ranging from Meursault in the south and on up to the Corton Mountain and Savigny les Beaune, caused substantial damage; the other, painfully localized, tore through the premier cru hillsides of Pommard and Volnay. The latter was the newsmaker, with up to 80% crop damage in some sectors, but also because this was the third consecutive year that Pommard and Volnay had been seriously damaged. There have been subsequent financial worries for small producers who were not insured.

Yet, despite these disasters, from Macon to Chablis there was a serious crop on the vines. Weather in July was mixed. Hot and sunny, then cloudy and cool. Constant rumblings of thunder in the distance kept everyone on edge.

Hail damage often leads to mildew, so vigilant vineyard work was crucial as the rains came and August turned cool, wet and gloomy, more like winter than the previous winter had been. Maturity stalled on the vine. And with the ever-present risk of rot cast a pall on the chill August air.

As we reached September, with fingers crossed, Burgundians put their hopes in the maxim that ‘September makes the wine’. Because in 2014, it was make or break. We needed a glorious September, and that’s exactly what we got. Light, warm northerly winds. Warm days, cool nights. Everything needed to salvage the potential mess that August had served up. In the end, we had the best harvest conditions that we have seen in many years.

Picking started on 8 September in the south, around the 15th in the Cote and Chablis, and finished around the 26th in the Hautes Cotes.

The crop came in healthy. There was no rot. And with normal sorting work in the winery (mostly where there had been hail damage) we brought in one of the healthiest harvests in recent years. The whites are balanced and intense. The reds show good ripe fruit. Some say the best vintage since 2009. A miracle!

Appellation

SAVIGNY-LES BEAUNE

COTE DE BEAUNE

Between the Corton mountain and Beaune, the landscape opens up into a gently sloping valley. Here, the hills of the Côte de Beaune recede a little on either side of the little river Rhoin. Savigny les Beaune is one of the less celebrated, best-kept secrets in Burgundy, mainly because it is hidden away in this valley, away from the north-south wine route that runs through the Cote. For this, its wines are among the best value you will find in the region.

Produced only in the commune of Savigny-lès-Beaune, appellation Savigny-lès-Beaune includes 22 premiers crus.

Wines

Red Savigny is a deep cherry color, going towards garnet. Its bouquet should be of red and black fruits (blackcurrant, cherry, raspberry) and flowers (violet). The body is ample and discreetly tannic and the fruit is generally forward. Roundness, volume and power should all be there. And when the balance is right, Savigny red can be among the most charming wines of the Cote de Beaune.

Savigny whites should be greeny gold, sometimes pale. Its nose is flowery and fresh, biscuity and citric with a touch of minerality in the best parcels. A lively attack keeps the overall effect fresh and clean, fleshy, persistent, and occasionally a touch of spice.

Terroirs

The gradient in this dome-shaped valley is gentle at first but steeper as you climb. Altitude varies from 250 to 400 meters. The lower slopes consist of alluvia from the river Rhoin. Higher, the geology is similar to that of the Corton mountain. At the Pernand-Vergelesses end, exposure is southerly and the soils are gravelly with a scattering of oolitic ironstone. Lower down, the red-brown limestone becomes more clay and pebbles. On the opposite side of the valley mouth, the slope faces east and the limestone soils include some sand.

Color

Red wines - Pinot Noir

White wines - Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

Reds : 306.19 ha (including 127.99 ha premier cru)

Whites : 41.63 ha (including 12.39 ha premier cru)

Food

Savigny red is solid and mouth-watering, with power enough to match for good cuts of beef, or even cooked foie gras . With roast fowl, the wine's fleshiness will compensate for the fibrous flesh of the bird and in the same way may soften more aromatic poultry dishes. For cheeses, it would do better with creamy types such as Chaource, Brie de Meaux, Reblochon, Mont d'Or or Époisses. The whites are lively with a straightforward attack, so would suit sauced fish dishes, while its richness can stand up to buttery preparations and sauces. It works well with goat cheeses, Gruyère and Comté, and fresh, milky cheeses like Cîteaux.

Appellations

On the label, the appellations 'Savigny-lès-Beaune' and 'Savigny-lès-Beaune 1er Cru' may be followed by the name of a specific vineyard, known as a climat.

The following climats are classified as premier cru:

Aux Clous

Aux Fourneaux

Aux Gravains

Aux Guettes

Aux Serpentières

Basses Vergelesses

Bataillère

Champ Chevrey

La Dominode

Les Charnières

Les Hauts Jarrons

Les Hauts Marconnets

Les Jarrons

Les Lavières

Les Marconnets

Les Narbantons

Les Peuillets

Les Rouvrettes

Les Talmettes

Les Vergelesses

Petits Godeaux

Redrescul

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard, known as a lieu-dit.

Aux Champs Chardons

Aux Champs des Pruniers

Aux Fourches

Aux Grands Liards

Aux Petits Liards

Aux Pointes

Dessus de Montchenevoy

Dessus les Gollardes

Dessus les Vermots

Ez Connardises

Grands Picotins

Guetottes

Le Village

Les Bas Liards

Les Bourgeots

Les Godeaux

Les Gollardes

Les Goudelettes

Les Petits Picotins

Les Peuillets

Les Pimentiers

Les Planchots de la Champagne

Les Planchots du Nord

Les Prévaux

Les Ratausses

Les Saucours

Les Vermots

Moutier Amet

Roichottes

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