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Burgundy Wine Cellars

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Type
Red Wine
Domaine Jean Fery Morey St Denis 2013

Domaine Jean Fery Morey St Denis 2013

Appellation
Morey St Denis
Region
Côte de Nuits
Vintage
2013
Add To Cart
$48.00
 
SKU: EFER06R-13
Overview

Morey St Denis is an epicenter. With five Grand Cru and twenty 1er Cru parcels, this is some of the prime real estate in Burgundy. There is hardly an iffy vineyard in the village. And these are some of the most refined wines of the Cotes de Nuits. This village AOC from Domaine Jean Fery has black fruits that impose themselves, sweet and round, in a structure that is typical Morey minerality, with a freshness bred of fine tannins and good balance. Love these 2013s! 

Producer

Domaine Jean Fery

Nestled in the Hautes Cotes village of Echevronne, the Domaine Jean Fery is the master plan of Jean-Louis Fery, the latest in a wine line dating back to the mid-1800s. From 1994, with the help of Alain Meunier of the Domaine Jean-Jacques Confuron, the Domaine Jean Fery went bio (without actually claiming the certification) and started expanding their vineyard holdings. From the 2006 harvest, Pascal Marchand took the reins, continuing the domain's quest for quality and integrity.

Vintage

BURGUNDY 2013

Burgundy 2013 was yet another small crop. The fourth in as many years. Some of it will be very good, in both red and white. But for some producers it was a disaster. As we always do, let’s start with a run-down of the weather conditions over the growing season (what the locals tellingly call ‘the campaign’).

Winter was wet and hung on stubbornly. March snow gave way to a few spring-like days, and everyone thought the worst was over. But no. April was cold and wet. May was the wettest on record. We posted photos of ducks swimming in the flooded vineyards. And winter gloom and temperatures persisted.

June was better, but just. Flowering started in the early part of the month, but with the cool wet conditions it was erratic and irregular. Lots of coulure and millerandange as a result. These aborted grapes would be one of the reasons for a small 2013 yield, and would come in to play in the final outcome at harvest.

Summer arrived late in the month. But even the warm temperatures and relatively fine weather did little to dispel the feeling of instability. There was nothing consistent to make you feel like you could just settle in to grape growing.

Then in the third week of July, high pressure and high humidity built up to a series of storms, the most violent of which tore out of the Savigny valley on the 23rd. Like a military gunship, the hail storm swept across the Savigny vines, hit Pernand on the west side of the Corton Mountain and headed south across Beaune, Pommard and Volnay. Producers tell us it lasted almost half an hour. It was the second year running that Pommard and Volnay were ravaged.

The humidity continued into August, and producers up and down the Cote nervously watched the sky. The big fear now was that damaged grapes would rot of mildew and odium, so preventive spraying intensified. If there was a bright spot in the growing season, it was the dry spell in mid-August. The damaged grapes shriveled and dropped off the vine, making the inevitable sorting at harvest more manageable.

Yields were tiny, even in the areas not ripped by hail. But the quality of the fruit was good going into September in the Cotes de Nuits and the white wine production south of Beaune, as well as in the Chalonnaise, Maconnais and Chablis.

Most of the harvest came in in the first weeks of October, the latest Burgundy vintages since 1991 and 1978. Maturity arrived at the end. Slowly at first, just like Pinot Noir and Chardonnay like it to be. But that slow maturity turned into a gallop, especially for the whites. From Macon to Chablis, the quality of 2013 whites comes down to crucial decisions about when to pick in the final few days.

Two months prior to harvest, the mood was gloomy. And granted, those poor producers who got slammed in July will suffer for years. (Some say that another small crop in 2014 could force some out of business.) But there is quality in many cellars. The reds will be highly variable, but the best wines (from domains that sorted the harvest carefully as it came to the cuverie) are fresh, deeply colored and beautifully ripe, with balance that seems apt for long aging. As always, you have to know who made the wine. There is more consistent quality in the whites across the board. Some say an excellent exciting year.

Appellation

SAVIGNY-LES BEAUNE

COTE DE BEAUNE

Between the Corton mountain and Beaune, the landscape opens up into a gently sloping valley. Here, the hills of the Côte de Beaune recede a little on either side of the little river Rhoin. Savigny les Beaune is one of the less celebrated, best-kept secrets in Burgundy, mainly because it is hidden away in this valley, away from the north-south wine route that runs through the Cote. For this, its wines are among the best value you will find in the region.

Produced only in the commune of Savigny-lès-Beaune, appellation Savigny-lès-Beaune includes 22 premiers crus.

Wines

Red Savigny is a deep cherry color, going towards garnet. Its bouquet should be of red and black fruits (blackcurrant, cherry, raspberry) and flowers (violet). The body is ample and discreetly tannic and the fruit is generally forward. Roundness, volume and power should all be there. And when the balance is right, Savigny red can be among the most charming wines of the Cote de Beaune.

Savigny whites should be greeny gold, sometimes pale. Its nose is flowery and fresh, biscuity and citric with a touch of minerality in the best parcels. A lively attack keeps the overall effect fresh and clean, fleshy, persistent, and occasionally a touch of spice.

Terroirs

The gradient in this dome-shaped valley is gentle at first but steeper as you climb. Altitude varies from 250 to 400 meters. The lower slopes consist of alluvia from the river Rhoin. Higher, the geology is similar to that of the Corton mountain. At the Pernand-Vergelesses end, exposure is southerly and the soils are gravelly with a scattering of oolitic ironstone. Lower down, the red-brown limestone becomes more clay and pebbles. On the opposite side of the valley mouth, the slope faces east and the limestone soils include some sand.

Color

Red wines - Pinot Noir

White wines - Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

Reds : 306.19 ha (including 127.99 ha premier cru)

Whites : 41.63 ha (including 12.39 ha premier cru)

Food

Savigny red is solid and mouth-watering, with power enough to match for good cuts of beef, or even cooked foie gras . With roast fowl, the wine's fleshiness will compensate for the fibrous flesh of the bird and in the same way may soften more aromatic poultry dishes. For cheeses, it would do better with creamy types such as Chaource, Brie de Meaux, Reblochon, Mont d'Or or Époisses. The whites are lively with a straightforward attack, so would suit sauced fish dishes, while its richness can stand up to buttery preparations and sauces. It works well with goat cheeses, Gruyère and Comté, and fresh, milky cheeses like Cîteaux.

Appellations

On the label, the appellations 'Savigny-lès-Beaune' and 'Savigny-lès-Beaune 1er Cru' may be followed by the name of a specific vineyard, known as a climat.

The following climats are classified as premier cru:

Aux Clous

Aux Fourneaux

Aux Gravains

Aux Guettes

Aux Serpentières

Basses Vergelesses

Bataillère

Champ Chevrey

La Dominode

Les Charnières

Les Hauts Jarrons

Les Hauts Marconnets

Les Jarrons

Les Lavières

Les Marconnets

Les Narbantons

Les Peuillets

Les Rouvrettes

Les Talmettes

Les Vergelesses

Petits Godeaux

Redrescul

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard, known as a lieu-dit.

Aux Champs Chardons

Aux Champs des Pruniers

Aux Fourches

Aux Grands Liards

Aux Petits Liards

Aux Pointes

Dessus de Montchenevoy

Dessus les Gollardes

Dessus les Vermots

Ez Connardises

Grands Picotins

Guetottes

Le Village

Les Bas Liards

Les Bourgeots

Les Godeaux

Les Gollardes

Les Goudelettes

Les Petits Picotins

Les Peuillets

Les Pimentiers

Les Planchots de la Champagne

Les Planchots du Nord

Les Prévaux

Les Ratausses

Les Saucours

Les Vermots

Moutier Amet

Roichottes

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