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Burgundy Wine Cellars

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Type
White Wine
Domaine Borgeot Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru 'Morgeot' 2014

Domaine Borgeot Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru 'Morgeot' 2014

Appellation
Chassagne Montrachet 1er Cru
Region
Côte de Beaune
Vintage
2014
Add To Cart
$69.00
 
SKU: EBOR05W-14
Overview

Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru ‘Morgeot’ is a big vineyard made up of lots of sub-divisions. Much of it is more apt for Pinot Noir than Chardonnay, but that’s another story. But the parts that are good for Chardonnay are really, really good. And a proper Morgeot like this one from the Borgeots has weight, power and depth. It is dense, intense; verging on spicy with a silky finish. One of the great white Burgundies.

Producer
The Borgeot brothers, Pascal and Laurent, have great 'touch' with Chardonnay, producing classy and distictive village and 1er cru wines in Burgundy's 'golden triangle' of Puligny-Montrachet, Chassagne-Montrachet and Meursault. But Santenay is home turf, and their wines from there and the Cotes Chalonnaise just to the south are undiscovered gems and also well worth a look.
Vintage

BURGUNDY 2014

2014 was a year for maxims in Burgundy. One was the ‘don’t count your chickens’ warning. And another, a keystone in Burgundy wine making, was ‘September makes the wine’. Simple truths to heed.

After three very small harvests, Burgundy urgently needed to fill its cellars. And despite some heart-breaking setbacks and a growing season that was jumbled in disorder, a decent amount of wine was produced. Not enough, of course. But ‘correct’, as the French would say.

There was no winter to speak of, followed by a mild and sunny period from February through April that saw some rain, but less than normal. The vine got going early, and talk was of a late August harvest.

But May was cool and rainy, which slowed the development. The vine began to flower in the last week of May in the southern part of the region. So at that point, counting the traditional 100 days from flowering to harvest, picking would start in early September. The weather during the flowering period was sunny and warm with just enough rain for this critical period to unfold and to finish.

And then early June was hot. Summer hot. As June was in 2003, some have said. This speeded things up. The flowering in the northern part of the region, and in those vineyards at higher altitudes, got a kick that would help them to phenolic maturity later.

With these conditions, fruit began to appear soon thereafter, and by the end of June small grapes had formed and clustered. The hot dry conditions however led to both millerandage (unevenly formed bunches made up of normal grapes and thick-skinned seedless berries ) and coulure (buds that never flowered), both of which reduce the overall crop, but which can give concentration to the remaining fruit.

Flowering and fruit set was certainly among the earliest of the past twenty years, with as much as a week head start on what would be considered normal here. And if you compare 2013 to 2014, we were three weeks in advance.

Then disaster struck. At the end of June, a series of violent hail storms ripped through the region. One in the Cote de Nuits, where parts of Nuits and Chambolle-Musigny were hit with 20% crop loss. The other two in the Cote de Beaune: the first, widespread, ranging from Meursault in the south and on up to the Corton Mountain and Savigny les Beaune, caused substantial damage; the other, painfully localized, tore through the premier cru hillsides of Pommard and Volnay. The latter was the newsmaker, with up to 80% crop damage in some sectors, but also because this was the third consecutive year that Pommard and Volnay had been seriously damaged. There have been subsequent financial worries for small producers who were not insured.

Yet, despite these disasters, from Macon to Chablis there was a serious crop on the vines. Weather in July was mixed. Hot and sunny, then cloudy and cool. Constant rumblings of thunder in the distance kept everyone on edge.

Hail damage often leads to mildew, so vigilant vineyard work was crucial as the rains came and August turned cool, wet and gloomy, more like winter than the previous winter had been. Maturity stalled on the vine. And with the ever-present risk of rot cast a pall on the chill August air.

As we reached September, with fingers crossed, Burgundians put their hopes in the maxim that ‘September makes the wine’. Because in 2014, it was make or break. We needed a glorious September, and that’s exactly what we got. Light, warm northerly winds. Warm days, cool nights. Everything needed to salvage the potential mess that August had served up. In the end, we had the best harvest conditions that we have seen in many years.

Picking started on 8 September in the south, around the 15th in the Cote and Chablis, and finished around the 26th in the Hautes Cotes.

The crop came in healthy. There was no rot. And with normal sorting work in the winery (mostly where there had been hail damage) we brought in one of the healthiest harvests in recent years. The whites are balanced and intense. The reds show good ripe fruit. Some say the best vintage since 2009. A miracle!

Appellation

CHASSAGNE-MONTRACHET

COTE DE BEAUNE

In the very south of the Côte de Beaune. Chassagne-Montrachet is one of the triumvirate in the 'golden traingle' of white Burgundy (with Puligny-Montrachet and Meursault). The broad hillside that it shares with Puligny brings out an extraordinary expression of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. In Chassagne, they are grown side by side, such is the complexity of the terroir. The zone includes some plots in the neighboring village of Remigny which shares the same soil conditions. Extensive marble quarries which form a cliff face in the vineyards, are the source of the stone that went into the building of the Trocadero in Paris and more recently the Louvre Pyramid.

Produced in the communes of Chassagne-Montrachet and Remigny, the appellation Chassagne-Montrachet includes 55 premiers crus. The commune of Chassagne-Montrachet also produces 3 grands crus: Montrachet, Batard-Montrachet and Criot-Batard-Montrachet.

Wines

White Chassagne Montrachet can be one of the world's great Chardonnays. At its best it is glittering gold with hints of green. Aromas of honeysuckle and hazelnut with a citrus acidity in youth. Deep, smokey gun-flint minerality. Notes of honey and fleshy pear. Luscious attack, round and decadent with the minerality carrying the mid-palate through to a long finish.

Red Chassagne Montrachet (sadly more and more rare in the shadow of white Chassagne's popularity) can have one of the most beautiful and brilliant robes of all of the Cote de Beaune. The nose is cherry and nutty cherry pit with spicy notes and Pinot savagery with age. There can be great substance to a Chassagne red, a depth that can be overlooked because of the prettiness of the fruit. Young tannins can be austere, or at least used to be. The modern Chassagne red tends to be more fruit forward and open.

Terroirs

At altitudes between 220 and 325 meters, the succession of rocks from the top down is first rauracien then callovien and finally argovien. The soil of the various climats range from pebbly limestone, through marls, to sandy soils with a Jurassic basis.

Color

White wines - Chardonnay

Red wines - Pinot Noir

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

Whites : 187.16 ha (including 116.60 ha premier cru)

Reds : 114.27 ha (including 33.43 ha Premier Cru)

Food

The opulence and power of the whites work well with delicate white meats such as poultry or veal. Fish, either in well-spiced couscous or in curries or stir-fries, are also well-suited. Salmon, in itself highly aromatic, works particularly well. The premiers crus will complement crayfish, lobster, or even foie gras.

Chassagne reds can be powerful, despite the first impression of freshness and fruit. This makes it a good match with quality cuts of meat such as grilled or roast lamb, grilled pork and spicy meat dishes in general. The premier crus can go to game birds.

Appellations

The following climats are classified premier cru:

Abbaye de Morgeot

Blanchot dessus

Bois de Chassagne

Cailleret

Champs Jendreau

Chassagne

Chassagne du Clos Saint-Jean

Clos Chareau

Clos Pitois

Clos Saint-Jean

Dent de Chien

En Cailleret

En Remilly

En Virondot

Ez Crets

Ez Crottes

Francemont

Guerchère

La Boudriotte

La Cardeuse

La Chapelle

La Grande Borne

La Grande Montagne

La Maltroie

La Romanée

La Roquemaure

Les Baudines

Les Boirettes

Les Bondues

Les Brussonnes

Les Champs gain

Les Chaumées

Les Chaumes

Les Chenevottes

Les Combards

Les Commes

Les Embazées

Les Fairendes

Les Grandes Ruchottes

Les Grands Clos

Les Macherelles

Les Murées

Les Pasquelles

Les Petites Fairendes

Les Petits Clos

Les Places

Les Rebichets

Les Vergers

Morgeot

Petingeret

Tête du Clos

Tonton Marcel

Vide Bourse

Vigne Blanche

Vigne Derrière

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard known as a lieu-dit:

Blanchot Dessous

Bouchon de Corvée

Champ Derrière

Champs de Morjot

Clos Bernot

Dessous les Mues

En Journoblot

En l'Ormeau

En Pimont

Fontaine Sot

La Bergerie

La Canière

La Canotte

La Goujonne

La Platière

La Têtière

Le Clos Reland

Le Concis du Champs

Le Parterre

Le Poirier du Clos

Les Battaudes

Les Benoites

Les Beuttes

Les Chambres

Les Charnières

Les Chaumes

Les Chênes

Les Encégnières

Les Essarts

Les Grandes Terres

Les Houillères

Les Lombardes

Les Masures

Les Meix Goudard

Les Morichots

Les Mouchottes

Les Perclos

Les Pierres

Les Plantes Momières

Les Voillenots Dessous

Plante du Gaie

Plante Saint Aubin

Pot Bois

Puits Merdreaux

Sur Matronge

Voillenot Dessous

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