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Burgundy Wine Cellars

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Type
Red Wine
Domaine Borgeot Chassagne Montrachet 'Champs de Morgeot' 2015

Domaine Borgeot Chassagne Montrachet 'Champs de Morgeot' 2015

Appellation
Chassagne Montrachet
Region
Côte de Beaune
Vintage
2015
Add To Cart
$39.00
 
SKU: EBOR09R-15
Overview

If you do not know Chassagne Montrachet red, you are missing one of the great pleasures of Pinot in Burgundy. This lieu dit 'Champs de Morgeot' is lush and spicy, with a totally different spin on the Pinot Noir from further north in Volnay and Pommard.  Luscious and juicy, in the hands of the Borgeot brothers this is a gem of a Pinot, with great structure and density infused with black fruits. 

Producer
The Borgeot brothers, Pascal and Laurent, have great 'touch' with Chardonnay, producing classy and distictive village and 1er cru wines in Burgundy's 'golden triangle' of Puligny-Montrachet, Chassagne-Montrachet and Meursault. But Santenay is home turf, and their wines from there and the Cotes Chalonnaise just to the south are undiscovered gems and also well worth a look.
Vintage

BURGUNDY 2015 VINTAGE

We have resisted writing the Elden Selections Burgundy 2015 harvest report until now (April 2017), mainly to let the hub-bub and hyperbole settle down, but more importantly to be sure that the claims we are about to make are justified. We’ve seen too many vintages vaunted as ‘the year of the century’, when really the wines simply showed well young. Burgundy 2015 is a truly extraordinary vintage. The reds are rich, ripe, balanced and powerful. And from all over the region they express chiseled, focused terroir. Despite their youthful seductive charm, these are wines to keep, with serious ripe tannins already melted into explosive fruit.

Comparisons have been drawn with the 2005 vintage, though there is more concentration in the 2015s than in the 2005s. Like a caterpillar changing to a butterfly, great vintages often go to sleep in the bottle. And 2005 is just reawakening from several ‘dumb’ years. It’s been worth the wait. The wines have metamorphosed. 2015 might be similar. And if the comparison is apt, investors in 2015 should appreciate the youthful beauty of this great vintage now, but be prepared to be patient.

That said, 2005 was no ‘year of the century’. But 2015 is also being compared to 1990, which arguably was. And I hear that Michel Lafarge, one of Burgundy’s respected elders, says he remembers drinking 1929s, and he draws parallels. The whites are a bit more uneven, and early reports claimed that the vintage lacks acidity. Certainly, these are wines which are riper and more luxuriant than the exquisite purity of 2014 white Burgundy. But there is no risk that well-made wines will be overly ample or flabby. The best wines will have benefited from the barrel. Comparisons are drawn to 1985, one of the great vintages in white.

The heterogeneity in 2015 white Burgundy is due to the tricky growing season, which was mostly hot and dry, but which cooled significantly in September. Was it better to pick early or late? And did the wine deserve more or less barrel aging? These are questions which will be answered producer-by-producer, bottle-by-bottle over the coming years. But what is clear is that they 2015s are concentrated, fresh and structured.

We believe that to understand a vintage, it is important to look at the weather. Because Burgundy is a single-grape wine, the only thing that changes from year to year in a producer’s vineyard is the weather. So we look for patterns and try to analyze what makes a good year, a bad year…and in this case, an excellent year.

The winter of 2014-2015 was uneventful. It was never really cold, but when it was, it was dry. Mostly it was mild, so we had more rain than snow. We would need the replenished water reserves in the long hot summer ahead.

April was warm and dry, and bud-burst took place early. Mornings in May were sunny, afternoons cloudy, and overall cool and dry. The vines began to flower in the last week of the month, so we knew we were looking at a harvest in early to mid-September.

In early July, the mood started to mount towards hopeful. The weather had been steady, dry and cool. But slowly during the month, temperatures began to rise, and in the last week of July hit 30C. The flowering had been successful, so there was a good crop on the vines.

Day after day of warm dry conditions brought drought considerations into play. But no hail for once! August continued in this way. Hot and dry. A little welcome rain later in the month, but just enough to keep the stress levels down. But no storms or hail. And extremely healthy fruit on the vine. No rot, no mildew, no odium. The mood was optimistic, even euphoric.

Harvest ostensibly started the first Monday of September. And days later the weather broke, and a cool period set in for ideal harvest conditions, stabilizing acidity levels. It stayed this way until September 12th when the first serious rain in two months fell in the southern part of the region. Harvest was disrupted for a few days, but the 19th, it was pretty much all over.

Appellation

CHASSAGNE-MONTRACHET

COTE DE BEAUNE

In the very south of the Côte de Beaune. Chassagne-Montrachet is one of the triumvirate in the 'golden traingle' of white Burgundy (with Puligny-Montrachet and Meursault). The broad hillside that it shares with Puligny brings out an extraordinary expression of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. In Chassagne, they are grown side by side, such is the complexity of the terroir. The zone includes some plots in the neighboring village of Remigny which shares the same soil conditions. Extensive marble quarries which form a cliff face in the vineyards, are the source of the stone that went into the building of the Trocadero in Paris and more recently the Louvre Pyramid.

Produced in the communes of Chassagne-Montrachet and Remigny, the appellation Chassagne-Montrachet includes 55 premiers crus. The commune of Chassagne-Montrachet also produces 3 grands crus: Montrachet, Batard-Montrachet and Criot-Batard-Montrachet.

Wines

White Chassagne Montrachet can be one of the world's great Chardonnays. At its best it is glittering gold with hints of green. Aromas of honeysuckle and hazelnut with a citrus acidity in youth. Deep, smokey gun-flint minerality. Notes of honey and fleshy pear. Luscious attack, round and decadent with the minerality carrying the mid-palate through to a long finish.

Red Chassagne Montrachet (sadly more and more rare in the shadow of white Chassagne's popularity) can have one of the most beautiful and brilliant robes of all of the Cote de Beaune. The nose is cherry and nutty cherry pit with spicy notes and Pinot savagery with age. There can be great substance to a Chassagne red, a depth that can be overlooked because of the prettiness of the fruit. Young tannins can be austere, or at least used to be. The modern Chassagne red tends to be more fruit forward and open.

Terroirs

At altitudes between 220 and 325 meters, the succession of rocks from the top down is first rauracien then callovien and finally argovien. The soil of the various climats range from pebbly limestone, through marls, to sandy soils with a Jurassic basis.

Color

White wines - Chardonnay

Red wines - Pinot Noir

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

Whites : 187.16 ha (including 116.60 ha premier cru)

Reds : 114.27 ha (including 33.43 ha Premier Cru)

Food

The opulence and power of the whites work well with delicate white meats such as poultry or veal. Fish, either in well-spiced couscous or in curries or stir-fries, are also well-suited. Salmon, in itself highly aromatic, works particularly well. The premiers crus will complement crayfish, lobster, or even foie gras.

Chassagne reds can be powerful, despite the first impression of freshness and fruit. This makes it a good match with quality cuts of meat such as grilled or roast lamb, grilled pork and spicy meat dishes in general. The premier crus can go to game birds.

Appellations

The following climats are classified premier cru:

Abbaye de Morgeot

Blanchot dessus

Bois de Chassagne

Cailleret

Champs Jendreau

Chassagne

Chassagne du Clos Saint-Jean

Clos Chareau

Clos Pitois

Clos Saint-Jean

Dent de Chien

En Cailleret

En Remilly

En Virondot

Ez Crets

Ez Crottes

Francemont

Guerchère

La Boudriotte

La Cardeuse

La Chapelle

La Grande Borne

La Grande Montagne

La Maltroie

La Romanée

La Roquemaure

Les Baudines

Les Boirettes

Les Bondues

Les Brussonnes

Les Champs gain

Les Chaumées

Les Chaumes

Les Chenevottes

Les Combards

Les Commes

Les Embazées

Les Fairendes

Les Grandes Ruchottes

Les Grands Clos

Les Macherelles

Les Murées

Les Pasquelles

Les Petites Fairendes

Les Petits Clos

Les Places

Les Rebichets

Les Vergers

Morgeot

Petingeret

Tête du Clos

Tonton Marcel

Vide Bourse

Vigne Blanche

Vigne Derrière

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard known as a lieu-dit:

Blanchot Dessous

Bouchon de Corvée

Champ Derrière

Champs de Morjot

Clos Bernot

Dessous les Mues

En Journoblot

En l'Ormeau

En Pimont

Fontaine Sot

La Bergerie

La Canière

La Canotte

La Goujonne

La Platière

La Têtière

Le Clos Reland

Le Concis du Champs

Le Parterre

Le Poirier du Clos

Les Battaudes

Les Benoites

Les Beuttes

Les Chambres

Les Charnières

Les Chaumes

Les Chênes

Les Encégnières

Les Essarts

Les Grandes Terres

Les Houillères

Les Lombardes

Les Masures

Les Meix Goudard

Les Morichots

Les Mouchottes

Les Perclos

Les Pierres

Les Plantes Momières

Les Voillenots Dessous

Plante du Gaie

Plante Saint Aubin

Pot Bois

Puits Merdreaux

Sur Matronge

Voillenot Dessous

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